mark :: blog :: c2net

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As I was commiting the template for this weeks issue of Apache Week I noticed that it has now been exactly eight years since I wrote the first issue. Back then Apache wasn't so popular and the documentation was lacking. Apache Week was designed specifically to give administrators the confidence to try the Apache web server on their machines without having to parse the hundreds of messages each week on the developer mailing list. That first issue was written over a 64k ISDN dial-up line from a computer perched on stark IKEA tabletop. Friday afternoons were spent writing up what had happened during the week. Not much has changed. Actually, I think that IKEA tabletop is still sitting in storage somewhere at Red Hat in Guildford. I wish I'd kept hold of it, it would have been useful for my girlfriends sons train layout.

Over the years there have been many times when we've thought about stopping production, usually when a competitor announced some other Apache magazine that we thought would do a better job than we do. But most of them gave up. They probably realised that there wasn't any money to be made from an Apache httpd journal.

UK Web became C2Net which became Red Hat, and Apache Week is still going strong. We'll have to think of something exciting to do for our tenth birthday.

I wrote a Windows application last night! Then realised that I'd actually not written any windows stuff for over ten years. The last Windows app I wrote was with Paul Sutton back in 1993 when the Windows Sockets Library had just been brought out. We wrote a winsock Connect-4-type game. When I visited Microsoft whilst working at C2Net I actually met one of the winsock original authors who even remembered using our game. Anyway, Windows applications seem to be a whole different world; with hundreds of web sites trying to sell you utilities. Awful utilities. Things you could do with 3 lines of Perl that the author has made shareware and wants you to pay $15 to unlock.

So to spread some good Karma my OTP OPIE S/KEY client thingy is free, with source. Although I have to admit that it's probably about 40 lines of code linking to existing libraries, and it probably took me longer to write the web page and draw the icon than write the app.

Now I can get back to doing the work on the system that I needed to use the OTP calculator to log into in the first place ;)

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Hi! I'm Mark Cox. This blog gives my thoughts and opinions on my security work, open source, fedora, home automation, and other topics.