Mark J Cox, mark@awe.com  
   
mark :: blog :: fedora

<< prev [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 ]



At FudCon I talked about the lack of any recent Linux worms, the last being a couple of years ago - but as of this weekend I've a new Linux worm to talk about, Lupii. This Linux worm was detected around the 5th November 2005 and is designed to exploit a flaw CVE-2005-1921 in the PHP PEAR XML-RPC Server package through a number of third party PHP scripts.

Red Hat released updates to PHP to correct this vulnerability for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 and 4 in July 2005. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 was not affected by this vulnerability. Fedora Core 4 and Fedora Core 3 also got updates in July.

Our analysis showed that the default SELinux targeted policy on Enterprise Linux 4 would have blocked the specific instances of this worm seen so far, but is not sufficient to block a worm written differently from exploiting this vulnerability if left unpatched. Time to make sure all your servers are up2date!



On Friday we read about the Firefox security issue, CAN-2005-2871. This issue looked like it could well be a 'critical' issue potentially allowing a malicious web page to control a heap buffer overflow. We know that various technologies in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora Core are likely to reduce the chances of this being actually exploitable by an attacker -- checks foil the most usual way of exploiting heap overflows by messing with malloc control structures, and on x86 at least heap randomization makes an exploit harder. But this issue was already public and so we didn't have the luxury of time to be able to test the mitigation. So we initiated our emergency response process to get the packages through development and QA and got Firefox and Mozilla packages out via Red Hat Network within 20 hours of this issue being public (due to the awesome work from engineering folks, QA folks, and the security response team who worked late into Friday night to get this done).



Fedora Security

Just finished the security audit for FC4 candidate - For 20030101-20050605 there are a potential 861 CVE named vulnerabilities that could have affected FC4 packages. 759 (88%) of those are fixed because FC4 includes an upstream version that includes a fix, 8 (1%) are still outstanding, and 94 (11%) are fixed with a backported patch. I'll post all the details to fedora-devel-list later in the week. I'm also giving a keynote about Fedora and security response at FudCon later this month.

OpenSSL Security

A CSO remarked to me a couple of weeks ago that their perception was that OpenSSL had a lot of serious security issues over the years. In fact it's really only had a couple of serious issues, and in total only 15 issues in the last 4 years. So in the style of the Apache vulnerability database I did one for OpenSSL. This is now publically available and we'll keep it up to date. The page is built from a XML database of the issues.



Last week we published fixes for flaws in libPNG found by a UK researcher. Since these flaws didn't get much press attention I wanted to take this opportunity to fill in a few of the details. If you don't want the details just goto https://rhn.redhat.com/cve/CAN-2004-0597.html and update your systems right now.

Chris Evans discovered a stack buffer overflow in the libPNG library. This means that an attacker could create a malicious PNG image file to take advantage of the flaw. If you were to view that malicious image on your system then it could execute arbitrary code as you. Since most applications that display PNG files are linked to libPNG or contain libPNG code, that increases the risk of this flaw.

Whilst researching affected applications we found that most browsers were affected - so an attacker would simply have to put a malicious image onto a web site that you visit. You'd still need to be forced to visit that web site though. Or maybe the attacker can act as a man-in-the-middle and inject the malicious image file (as was reported recently at DefCon where wireless surfers had all their images replaced). More worrying are perhaps email applications that might load images by default, which could allow propegation of a worm. This isn't an issue that only affects Linux; just sending malicious images in attachments to someone using AppleMail on MAC OSX is enough to trigger the flaw.

Although i've not yet seen an exploit containing shellcode for this issue we believe it is triviallly exploitable. This is a "Critical" update.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux users need to update their libpng and Mozilla (which contained it's own copy of libpng) packages. Updating libpng is sufficient to protect all the applications that use that library to decode images (although you'll need to restart any applications you've already got running to pick up the change, it's probably easiest just to restart your system if you're unsure).

Fedora Core users should be protected against possible exploits of this issue by exec-shield, but should still upgrade (as a malicious PNG file would still crash an application).

https://rhn.redhat.com/cve/CAN-2004-0597.html

Because libpng is under a BSD-style license, anyone is basically free to use or include libpng even in closed-source products. So expect to see a whole raft of advisories over the coming weeks as other vendors come to discover that they're vulnerable to this issue.

<< prev [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 ]

       


Hi! I'm Mark Cox. This blog gives my thoughts and opinions on my security work, open source, fedora, home automation, and other topics.

pics from my twitter:


popular tags: [all], apache, apacheweek, cve, cvss, fedora, ha, metrics, microsoft, redhat, security, trips


Subscribe to RSS feed