mark :: blog

30 Jul 2009: How the Kaminsky SSL talk at Black Hat affects various OSS libraries

In his Black Hat paper and presentation yesterday, Dan Kaminsky highlighted some more issues he has found relating to SSL hash collisions and other PKI flaws. The video of the presentationis online now, so I'm sure the PDF paper will follow shortly. Some of these issues affect open source software, and some parts have already been addressed, so here is a quick summary including CVE names of the applicable bits:

MD2 signature verification

The first issue is that many web browsers still accept certificates with MD2 hash signatures, even though MD2 is no longer considered a cryptographically strong algorithm. This could make it easier for an attacker to create a malicious certificate that would be treated as trusted by a browser. It turns out that there are not many valid MD2 hash certificates around any more, and the main one that does exist is at the trusted root level anyway (and there is actually no need for a crypto library to verify the self-signature on a trusted root). So most vendors have chosen to address this issue by disabling MD2 completely for certificate verification. This is allocated CVE name CVE-2009-2409 ( single name for all affected products).

There is no immediate panic to address this issue as a critical security issue, as in order for it to be exploited an attacker still has to create a MD2 collision with this root certificate; something that is as of today still a significant amount of effort.

My CVSS v2 base score for CVE-2009-2409 would be 2.6 (AV:N/AC:H/Au:N/C:N/I:P/A:N)

Differences in Common Name handling

This issue is about how Common Names are checked for validity by applications. For example if a server presents a certificate with two CN entries, how does the app validate those. Does it use the first one, the last one, or all of them?

Leading 0's in Common Name handling

The second issue is all about inconsistencies in the interpretation of subject x509 names in certificates. Specifically "issue 2b, subattack 1" is where a malicious certificate can contain leading 0's in the OID. The idea is that an attacker could add in some OID into a certificate that, when handled by the Certificate Authority, would appear to be some extension and ignored, but when handled by OpenSSL would appear to be the Common Name OID. So the attacker would present the certificate to a client application and it might think that the OID is actually a Common Name, and accept the certificate where it otherwise should not.

OID overflow in Common Name handling

"issue 2b, subattack 2" is where a malicious certificate can have a very large integer in the OID. The idea is that an attacker could add in some OID into a certificate that, when handled by the CA, would appear to be some extension and ignored, but when handled by OpenSSL would overflow and appear to be the Common Name OID. So the attacker would present the certificate to a client application using OpenSSL and it might think that the OID is actually a Common Name, and accept the certificate where it otherwise should not.

NULL bytes in Common Name handling

"issue 2, attack 2c" is regarding NULL terminators in a Common Name field. If an attacker is able to get a carefully-crafted certificate signed by a Certificate Authority trusted by a browser, the attacker could use the certificate during a man-in-the-middle attack and potentially confuse the browser into accepting it by mistake.

My CVSS v2 base score for CVE-2009-2408 would be 4.3 (AV:N/AC:M/Au:N/C:N/I:P/A:N)

OpenSSL 'compat mode' subject name injection

"issue 2d" is how the OpenSSL command line utility will output unescaped subject X509 lines to standard output. So if some utility runs the openssl application from the command line and parses the text output, and if an attacker can craft a malicious certificate in such a way they fool a CA into signing it, they could present it to the utility and possibly fool that utility into thinking fields were different to what they actually are, perhaps allowing the certificate to be accepted as legitimate.

OpenSSL ASN1 printing crash

Also mentioned in the paper is a flaw in the filtering modes when a two or four byte wide character set is asked to be filtered.

My CVSS v2 base score for CVE-2009-0590 would be 2.6 (AV:N/AC:H/Au:N/C:N/I:N/A:P)

Created: 30 Jul 2009
Tagged as: , ,

0 comments (new comments disabled)

Hi! I'm Mark Cox. This blog gives my thoughts and opinions on my security work, open source, fedora, home automation, and other topics.