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26 Oct 2005: 80/20 rule

It seems like we have to produce a security advisory for ethereal every month. Whilst the issues being fixed are not particularly severe (mostly "moderate" by our severity rating), I was really curious if certain packages got significantly more issues than others. We keep lots of statistics about the security issues we fix in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and most of the raw data is available publically and kept up to date. With a small addition to log packages, the following statistics were easy to produce. I examined Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 from release to date as it has good quality vulnerability data and has been around for enough time.

The kernel accounted for 14% of all the vulnerabilities fixed, followed closely by mozilla (11%), ethereal (9%), squid (4%), gaim (4%), httpd (3%), php (3%), krb5 (2%).

In fact, half of all the vulnerabilities fixed are in only those 8 packages, and just 20 packages comprise of two-thirds of all vulnerabilities.

But we fix a large number of security issues rated as 'low' severity which can influence the data. So if we weight vulnerabilities by severity (I used a metric of "Critical *100 + Important*20 + Moderate*5 + Low") then you get this list:

Enterprise Linux 3 top 10 packages with the most 'more severe' issues:

#1 mozilla
#2 kernel
#3 gaim
#4 krb5
#5 cvs
#6 squid
#7 ethereal
#8 libpng
#9 cups
#10 php

Repeating this same process for Enterprise Linux 4, Firefox replaces Mozilla in the #1 position, thunderbird, HelixPlayer, and evolution (all new packages for Enterprise Linux 4) make the top 10 displacing libpng, cups, php, cvs.

Created: 26 Oct 2005
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Hi! I'm Mark Cox. This blog gives my thoughts and opinions on my security work, open source, fedora, home automation, and other topics.